catonhottinroof:

Georg Janny (1864–1935)

catonhottinroof:

Georg Janny (1864–1935)

▪georg janny ▪art ▪painting
My Least Favorite Trope (and this post will include spoilers for The Lego Movie, Guardians of the Galaxy, The Matrix, Western Civilization, and—cod help me—Bulletproof Monk*.) is the thing where there’s an awesome, smart, wonderful, powerful female character who by all rights ought to be the Chosen One and the hero of the movie, who is tasked with taking care of some generally ineffectual male character who is, for reasons of wish fulfillment, actually the person the film focuses on. She mentors him, she teaches him, and she inevitably becomes his girlfriend… and he gets the job she wanted: he gets to be the Chosen One even though she’s obviously far more qualified. And all he has to do to get it and deserve it is Man Up and Take Responsibility.

And that’s it. Every god-damned time. The mere fact of naming the films above and naming the trope gives away the entire plot and character arc of every single movie.
— Elizabeth Bear - My Least Favorite Trope (via feministquotes)
▪sexism ▪media ▪les mots

Kohei Nawa.

For an installation piece at the Aichi Triennale, Japanese artist Kohei Nawa used foam to give visitors the sensation of walking through the clouds at night:

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▪kohei nawa ▪art ▪installation art
Why is it that people are willing to spend $20 on a bowl of pasta with sauce that they might actually be able to replicate pretty faithfully at home, yet they balk at the notion of a white-table cloth Thai restaurant, or a tacos that cost more than $3 each? Even in a city as “cosmopolitan” as New York, restaurant openings like Tamarind Tribeca (Indian) and Lotus of Siam (Thai) always seem to elicit this knee-jerk reaction from some diners who have decided that certain countries produce food that belongs in the “cheap eats” category—and it’s not allowed out. (Side note: How often do magazine lists of “cheap eats” double as rundowns of outer-borough ethnic foods?)

Yelp, Chowhound, and other restaurant sites are littered with comments like, “$5 for dumplings?? I’ll go to Flushing, thanks!” or “When I was backpacking in India this dish cost like five cents, only an idiot would pay that much!” Yet you never see complaints about the prices at Western restaurants framed in these terms, because it’s ingrained in people’s heads that these foods are somehow “worth” more. If we’re talking foie gras or chateaubriand, fair enough. But be real: You know damn well that rigatoni sorrentino is no more expensive to produce than a plate of duck laab, so to decry a pricey version as a ripoff is disingenuous. This question of perceived value is becoming increasingly troublesome as more non-native (read: white) chefs take on “ethnic” cuisines, and suddenly it’s okay to charge $14 for shu mai because hey, the chef is ELEVATING the cuisine.
▪food ▪les mots ▪racism
fruitegg:

fruitegg:

ive got yearly exams for the next two weeks so i probably wont be posting anything during that time
starting off my hiatus with a shitty doodle, patting myself on the back for a job well done

aha im full of shit

fruitegg:

fruitegg:

ive got yearly exams for the next two weeks so i probably wont be posting anything during that time

starting off my hiatus with a shitty doodle, patting myself on the back for a job well done

aha im full of shit

▪those lines on her dress look like elegant insect legs ▪homestuck ▪aradia megido ▪fanart

—You think I owe you an apology.
—I think you owe me more than an apology.
—We had to find the mole. You know the drill. I was following orders, dear, same as you. Nevertheless, I’m sorry.
—I’m sorry I didn’t kill you. That’s my apology.
—Better luck next time.

▪the americans ▪tv series ▪keri russell ▪margo martindale ▪ladies
▪language ▪les mots
▪art ▪pixel art ▪gifs ▪cityscapes
laclefdescoeurs:

Valhalla, 1916, Edmond Van Dooren

laclefdescoeurs:

Valhalla, 1916, Edmond Van Dooren

▪edmond van dooren ▪art ▪painting ▪valhalla
IGN: All right, my girlfriend thinks I’m a monster for harvesting the Little Sisters [in BioShock]. Give me an argument that I can use so I’m not sleeping on the couch.

Levine: Um, well, I think the game is about choice, and I think if that’s your choice, you’ve got to live with it.

IGN: [laughs] Are you saying I’m doomed to the futon for the rest of my life?

Levine: [laughs] We give the choice to the player, and they have to live with the consequences of their actions. That’s what the game’s about, man!

IGN: C’mon, Ken, this is not what I expected, I expected to buy a game and play it, not attempt to sleep on my futon with no pillow.

Levine: Well, that’s how the game plays. If you’re gonna make that choice, you’ve gotta be prepared to roll with it, brother.

[…]

Levine: For me, the goal was always that we were dealing with some fairly resident moral issues here, and the idea that some of that may or may not be a child. And I felt, and the team felt like we had an obligation to handle that responsibly, and show the sequence to the player, to show him what’s happening … But to me, having [the Little Sister] in front of you, like we do in the game, and having you make that choice, it takes away the indemnity of the action and makes it very personal. I mean, you experienced that first hand with your girlfriend. [laughs] I think she saw that, it was very clear that you’re making a choice there, and [laughs] she responded to your choice. And that’s gratifying for me, because I think there should be a choice in games that bring about real life consequences. You may not be happy about it, but I’m happy about it.
▪bioshock ▪video games ▪quotes
▪darling idiot ▪gekkan shoujo nozaki kun ▪tv series ▪animation
1910-again:

Franciszek Siedlecki, Two Stars c.1914

1910-again:

Franciszek Siedlecki, Two Stars c.1914

▪franciszek siedlecki ▪two stars ▪art ▪prints
▪gekkan shoujo nozaki kun ▪tv series ▪animation ▪gifs
That said, stereotypes aren’t so much about people totally projecting things that completely aren’t there but about people having a framework with which they interpret things that actually are there. It’s not that racism causes people to see (for example) belligerent teenage boys where there are none, but that a white belligerent teenage boy is just seen as himself while a black belligerent teenage boy is part of a pattern, a script, and when people blindly follow the scripts in their head that leads to discrimination and prejudice.

So yeah, it is a fact, I think, that I was a bit off-putting in my Jeopardy! appearance—hyper-focused on the game, had an intense stare, clicked madly on the buzzer, spat out answers super-fast, wasn’t too charming in the interviews, etc.

But this may have taken root in people’s heads because I’m an Asian and the “Asian mastermind” is a meme in people’s heads that it wouldn’t have otherwise.

Look, we all know that there’s a trope in the movies where someone of a minority race is flattened out into just being “good at X” and that the white protagonist is the one we root for because unlike the guy who’s just “good at X” the protagonist has human depth, human relationships, a human point of view—and this somehow makes him more worthy of success than the antagonist who seems to exist just to be good at X.

So we root for Rocky against black guys who, by all appearances, really are better boxers than he is, because unlike them Rocky isn’t JUST a boxer, he has a girlfriend, he has hopes, he has dreams, etc. This comes up over and over again in movies where the athletic black competitor is set up as the “heel”—look at the black chick in Million Dollar Baby and how much we’re pushed to hate her. Look at all this “Great White Hope” stuff, historically, with Joe Louis.

So is it any surprise that this trope comes into play with Asians? That the Asian character in the movie is the robotic, heartless, genius mastermind who is only pure intellect and whom we’re crying out to be defeated by some white guy who may not be as brainy but has more pluck, more heart, more humanity? It’s not just Flash Gordon vs. Ming the Merciless, it’s stuff like how in the pilot episode of Girls Hannah gets fired in favor of an overachieving Asian girl who’s genuinely better at her job than she is (the Asian girl knows Photoshop and she doesn’t) and we’re supposed to sympathize with Hannah.

Okay, here’s one more comment from the Internet that kind of encapsulates it. The kind of un-self-awareness of what someone is saying when they say they’d prefer I not win because I try too hard at the game, work too hard at it, care too much about it, and that they’d prefer that a “likable average Joe” win.

This is disturbing because it amounts to basically an attack on competence, a desire to bust people who work very hard and have very strong natural gifts down in favor of “likable average Joes”—and it’s disturbing because the subtext is frequently that to be “likable” and “average” you have to have other traits that are comforting and appealing to an “average Joe” audience, like white skin and an American accent.
▪racism ▪arthur chu ▪quotes ▪media